Children and Young People Safety: Latest Research

CAPIC SYSTEMATIC REVIEW DATABASE & SAFETYLIT

A huge amount of research on preventing injuries is carried out across the world. It is difficult for injury prevention practitioners to keep up to date with the latest scientific evidence. Increasingly, scientists are pulling together all the high quality studies on particular topics and collating the results in systematic reviews.

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CHAPPIE Network Information Bulletin (Child Accident Prevention Practice and Information Exchange Network)

This Information Bulletin is prepared by Children in Wales every couple of months, and contains information on the latest news, research and reports from the field of Child Accident Prevention.

The CHAPPIE Information Bulletins can be downloaded at the following webpage http://www.childreninwales.org.uk/areasofwork/childsafety/chappie/index.html

Or you can contact Karen McFarlane to sign up to the CHAPPIE network and receive these occasional e-briefings by e-mail.

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HIGHLIGHTED RESEARCH

Please find below a list of highlighted studies in this area:

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A WICKED PROBLEM: EARLY CHILDHOOD SAFETY IN THE DYNAMIC, INTERACTIVE ENVIRONMENT OF HOME

Countries Covered: New Zealand
Date: 2013

Young children being injured at home is a perennial problem. When parents of young children and family workers discussed what influenced parents’ perceptions and responses to child injury risk at home, both “upstream” and “downstream” causal factors were identified. Among the former, complex and interactive facets of society and contemporary living emerged as potentially critical features. The “wicked problems” model arose from the need to find resolutions for complex problems in multidimensional environments and it proved a useful analogy for child injury. Designing dynamic strategies to provide resolutions to childhood injury, may address our over-dependence on ‘tame solutions’ that only deal with physical cause-and-effect relationships and which cannot address the complex interactive contexts in which young children are often injured.

Citation: Simpson, J.; Fougere, G.; McGee, R. A Wicked Problem: Early Childhood Safety in the Dynamic, Interactive Environment of Home. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 201310, 1647-1664.

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PARENTING INTERVENTIONS FOR THE PREVENTION OF UNINTENTIONAL INJURIES IN CHILDHOOD

Countries Covered: UK
Date: 2013

Parenting interventions, most commonly provided within the home using multi-faceted interventions, are effective in reducing child injury. Fairly consistent evidence suggests that they also improve home safety. This evidence relates mainly to interventions provided to families from disadvantaged populations, who are at risk of adverse child health outcomes, or whose families may benefit from extra support. Further research is required to explore mechanisms by which these interventions may reduce injury, to identify the features of parenting interventions that are necessary or sufficient to reduce injury, and to assess the generalisability of these findings to different population groups.

Citation: Kendrick D, Mulvaney CA, Ye L, Stevens T, Mytton JA, Stewart-Brown S. Parenting interventions for the prevention of unintentional injuries in childhood. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD006020. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006020.pub3.

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NATIONAL SURVEY OF THE INJURY PREVENTION ACTIVITIES OF CHILDREN’s CENTRES

Countries Covered: England
Date: 2013

Children’s centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. The authors surveyed children’s centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. The authors concluded children’s centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area.

Citation:Watson, M. C., A. Mulvaney, C., Kendrick, D., Stewart, J., Coupland, C., Hayes, M., Wynn, P. and Keeping Children Safe programme team (2013), National survey of the injury prevention activities of children’s centres. Health & Social Care in the Community. doi: 10.1111/hsc.12059

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NEW REPORT LINKING SCALDS TO DISADVANTAGED FAMILIES

Countries Covered: UK
Date: 2013

A new study by researchers from the University of Nottingham has found that children from deprived households are a staggering 80% more likely to have a scald compared to those in better-off homes.

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CHILD HOME INJURY MORTALITY IN EUROPE: A 16-COUNTRY ANALYSIS
Countries Covered: Europe
Date: 2011

Study Conclusions: Home injuries were the leading cause of injury death in children under 5 years of age in the countries under study and the inequalities found among the countries indicate potential for improvement. Evidence-based interventions exist to prevent these injuries and the barriers to their implementation ought to be determined and addressed.

Citation: Sengoelge M, Hasselberg M, Laflamme L. Eur J Public Health. 2011 Apr;21(2):166-70. Epub 2010 Apr 29.

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THERMOSTATIC MIXING VALVES ARE PROVEN TO REDUCE BATH SCALDS, ACCORDING TO RECENT STUDY
Countries Covered: UK
Date: 2011

A recent study involving the Glasgow Housing Association, the NHS and several universities, led by Professor Denise Kendrick at the University of Nottingham, explored the effectiveness of TMVs in over 100 homes in Glasgow. The study found that TMVs and accompanying educational leaflets are effective at reducing bath hot tap water temperatures in the short and longer term and are acceptable to families. The research team strongly recommends that whenever a bath is being replaced, it should be fitted with a TMV.

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FOUR IN 10 DEATHS AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE WORLDWIDE FROM INJURIES, STUDY FINDS
Countries Covered: World
Date: 2009

The first study into global deaths among 10-24 years olds has found that 2.6 million children and young people died in 2004, two in five of them from injuries and violence (Lancet 2009,374:881-92, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60741-8). The findings call into question the focus of worldwide child health policies, which prioritise HIV/AIDS and maternal mortality, say the authors.

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CHILDREN IN DEPRIVED AREAS AT MOST RISK OF ROAD INJURIES
Countries Covered: Great Britain
Date: 2009

Child pedestrians from the most deprived areas in Great Britain are four times more likely to be killed or injured on the roads than those from wealthier districts, a report by a cross party group of MPs said. Death rates among child pedestrians in Great Britain are worse than in France, the Netherlands, Japan, Austria, Australia, and Belgium, in terms of the number killed as a proportion of the population, says the report by the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee.

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INJURIES IN CHILDREN AGED 0-14 YEARS AND INEQUALITIES
Countries Covered: UK
Date: 2005

Injury mortality and morbidity among children aged 0-14 varies substantially depending on the child’s age, gender, socio-economic group, cultural and/or ethnic group, and where they live. This report describes and seeks to understand these variations and explains why each factor is associated with injury risk. It then highlights how a range of intervention studies have attempted to address these inequalities.

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