Road Safety: Latest Research

CAPIC SYSTEMATIC REVIEW DATABASE & SAFETYLIT

A huge amount of research on preventing injuries is carried out across the world. It is difficult for injury prevention practitioners to keep up to date with the latest scientific evidence. Increasingly, scientists are pulling together all the high quality studies on particular topics and collating the results in systematic reviews.

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HIGHLIGHTED RESEARCH

Please find below a list of highlighted studies in this area:

THE ADVOCACY FOR PEDESTRIAN SAFETY STUDY: CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL EVALUATING A POLITICAL ADVOCACY APPROACH TO REDUCE PEDESTRIAN INJURIES IN DEPRIVED COMMUNITIES

This study demonstrates the feasibility of an innovative approach to translational public health by targeting local politicians in a randomised controlled trial. The intervention package was positively viewed and raised interest but changes in interventions were not statistically significance. Longer term supported advocacy may be needed.

Citation: Lyons, RA et al (2013)  The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities. PloS one.

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RESEARCH DOCUMENT ON PREVENTING UNINTENTIONAL INJURIES
Countries Covered: Scotland
Date: 2013

NHS Health Scotland have released the following report ‘Evidence Summary: Public Health Interventions to prevent unintentional injuries among the under 15s”. The research considers injuries that happen in both the home and road environments.

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MAKING OUR ROADS SAFER FOR CYCLISTS
Countries Covered: UK
Date: 2013

new government-funded study is to be carried out into how Britain’s roads could be made safer for cyclists to re-duce the risk of cycling injuries, encourage more people to use bikes and improve public health.

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NON-LEGISLATIVE INTERVENTIONS FOR THE PROMOTION OF CYCLE HELMET WEARING BY CHILDREN
Countries Covered: World
Date: 2012

Study Conclusions: Non-legislative interventions appear to be effective in increasing observed helmet use, particularly community-based interventions and those providing free helmets. Those set in schools appear to be effective but possibly less so than community-based interventions. Interventions providing education only are less effective than those providing free helmets. There is insufficient evidence to recommend providing subsidised helmets at present. Interventions may be more effective if provided to younger rather than older children. There is evidence that interventions offered in healthcare settings can increase self reported helmet wearing. Further high-quality studies are needed to explore whether non-legislative interventions increase helmet wearing, and particularly the effect of providing subsided as opposed to free helmets, and of providing interventions in healthcare settings as opposed to in schools or communities.

Citation: Owen R, Kendrick D, Mulvaney C, Coleman T, Royal S. Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 2012 11(online): CD003985

Original 2005 study

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NHS BRISTOL – NON-COLLISION CYCLING SURVEY
Countries Covered: England
Date: 2012

NHS Bristol, Cycling City and the West of England Road Safety Partnership have been working together to conduct and publicise the results of a survey investigating the causes and circumstances of non-collision incidents (NCI). The survey found slipping on ice to be the main cause of NCIs, accounting for 1 in 4 NCIs. As a result, NHS Bristol has subsequently employed Lifecycle to work with employers to help them raise awareness of the hazards cyclists face when travelling to work in freezing conditions.

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DELIVERY OF LOCAL ROAD SAFETY: ROAD SAFETY RESEARCH REPORT NO. 124
Countries Covered: UK
Date: 2011

The Department for Transport commissioned AECOM, in
association with the Tavistock Institute, to design and deliver a
three-year independent evaluation of the delivery of local road
user safety.  The evaluation was commissioned to consider the following objectives: to evaluate the different strategies and plans for delivering road user safety; to assess what is being delivered, the key processes and how efficient local authority practices are; and to identify lessons and areas of good practice in road user safety investment.

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THE IMPACT OF 20 MPH TRAFFIC SPEED ZONES ON INEQUALITIES IN ROAD CASUALTIES IN LONDON
Countries Covered: England
Date: 2011

Conclusions: The implementation of 20 mph zones targeted at deprived areas has mitigated widening socioeconomic differentials in road injury in London and to some degree narrowed them, but there is limited potential for further gain.

Citation: Rebecca Steinbach, Chris Grundy, Phil Edwards, Paul Wilkinson, Judith Green. J Epidemiol Community Health doi:10.1136/jech.2010.112193.

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EVALUATION OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD ROAD SAFETY INITIATIVE
Countries Covered: England
Date: 2011

The Department for Transport established the Neighbourhood Road Safety Initiative (NRSI) in 2002. Fifteen Local Authorities (LAs) in England were funded to develop schemes to reduce road casualties in their most disadvantaged areas. A team led by the University College London (UCL) evaluated the impacts of the NRSI using a mixed methods approach. The evaluation showed a significant reduction in casualties during the NRSI.

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THE EFFECTS OF SMARTER CHOICE PROGRAMMES IN THE SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL TOWNS
Countries Covered: England
Date: 2010

To evaluate the results from ‘Sustainable Travel Towns’ carried out in Darlington, Peterborough and Worcester, a full independent report was  commissioned. The report shows that the ‘Smarter Choice’ packages which were implemented in these towns, resulted in increases in cycling, walking and bus use, and decreases in car use. The evaluation was led by Transport for Quality of life Ltd, with a team involving TRL, University of Aberdeen, AEA and the University of the West of England.

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20MPH SPEED ZONES WORK, SAYS NEW REPORT
Countries Covered: UK
Date: 2010

UK cities should have more 20mph speed zones, as they have cut road injuries by over 40% in London, a study claims. In particular the number of children killed or seriously injured has been halved over the past 15 years, the British Medical Journal reported. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine study estimates 20mph zones have the potential to prevent up to 700 casualties in London alone. At 20mph, it is estimated only one in 40 pedestrians is killed in a crash. This compares w ith a one in five chance for someone hit at 30mph. The researchers compared data on road collisions, injuries and deaths in London betw een 1986 and 2006, w ith speed limits on roads.

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